Adobe Photoshop - A Beginners Guide (1-day)

Class Description: This 1-day class is designed to get you comfortable working in the Photoshop environment. Gain confidence through practical exercises on cropping, working with text, selection tools and layers. Learn simple and flexible ways to alter and improve the look of your images. Learn how to use Adobe Bridge to view and organize your photo collections. Practice preparing images for email, web pages and print.

Exercise 1 - Getting you and Photoshop ready to go...

Exercise 2 - Gaining control over your image...

Exercise 3 - Using Adobe Bridge to manage your image collections...

Exercise 4 - All About Layers...

Exercise 5 - Cropping and Adjusting

Exercise 6 - Straightening and Adjusting - Output for Email

Exercise 7 - Retouching and Text

Exercise 8 - Canvas Size, Transformations and Adjustments

Exercise 9 - Select and Separate - Output for webpage

Exercise 10 - Select and Adjust

Exercise 11 - Outputting an image for Print

 

Instructor: Bill Morrison

Saturday, May 23, 2009 • 9:00am-4:00pm • 1 mtg
UHM Sakamaki C104, Manoa MultiMedia Lab • Pacific New Media

Download class files (zip)

• This class is designed for those with little or no Photoshop experience

• This class is designed to be taught live (5.5 hours)

• This class was designed for Photoshop CS3

• Download does not include demo images and images for exercise 11

Exercise 1 - Getting you and Photoshop ready to go...

Exercise 1 - Getting you and Photoshop ready to go...

In this exercise we'll explore and modify the Photoshop workspace. We'll look at some nuances of the Tool bar and tool options, then adjust program preferences and the color environment. Finally, we'll discuss the importance of working with a calibrated monitor.

Step by Step »

  1. Adobe Overview: Photoshop and its place in the Adobe product family
  2. Launching Photoshop
  3. A quick tour of the Photoshop Workspace:
    • Menu Bar - along the top and intuitively labeled
    • Tool Bar - along the left side
    • Options Bar - under the Menu Bar, with options that change depending on what tool you have selected
    • Palettes - To the right. All palettes are found in the Menu Bar, under Window
  4. Modifying the Workspace:
    • Moving a palette
    • Contracting / Expanding a palette
    • Closing / Launching a palette
    • Setting the default workspace: From the Menu Bar go to Window > Workspace > Default Workspace
  5. Tool Bar nuances:
    • Tools that have a little triangle in the lower right corner have additional (and often related) tools grouped under them
    • To access these additional tools, click and hold, then move and release the mouse over the tool you want
    • Tools have options - these options can be set in the Options Bar - options are 'sticky'
    • To reset all tools options back to their default values, pick any tool in the Tool Bar, right-click on that tool's icon in the Options Bar, and choose Reset All Tools
  6. Setting important Preferences (for class):
    • On a Mac, from the Menu Bar, go to Photoshop > Preferences
    • On a PC, from the Menu Bar, go to Edit > Preferences
    • Under General: set UI Font Size to Large
    • Under General: check Zoom with Scroll Wheel
    • Under File Handling: make sure Prefer Adobe Camera raw for JPG Files is off
    • Under File Handling: set Maximize PSD and PSB File Compatibility to Always
    • Under Performance: set the History States to 50
    • Under Cursors: select Full Size Brush Tip
    • Restart Photoshop
    • Preference settings will vary from person to person (i.e. your personal preferences)
    • Re-visit your preferences after you have spent time working with Photoshop
  7. Setting your Photoshop color environment:
    • From the Menu Bar, go to Edit > Color Settings
    • Print designer? pick the North America Prepress 2 preset
    • Web designer? pick the North America Web/Internet preset
    • Print and web designer? Toggle when needed
  8. You really should calibrate you monitor
Exercise 2 - Gaining control over your image...

Exercise 2 - Gaining control over your image...

In this exercise we'll practice opening an image, zooming in and zooming out, panning, and toggling between different screen modes. We'll also practice moving forward and backward in time...with vital keyboard shortcuts.

Step by Step »

  1. From the Menu Bar, choose File > Open
  2. Navigate to the 'ps-1-day' folder (on the desktop) and open simpsons.jpg
  3. Test to see if the scroll wheel on your mouse is working (remember...you told it to work in the Preferences)
  4. To give yourself a little room to work, drag out the lower right corner of the image window (gripper bar)
  5. Select the Zoom Tool from the Tool bar
  6. Zoom in to one of the Simpson's characters by clicking
  7. Zoom out by holding down the OPTION [PC/ALT] key (the cursor should turn from a + to a -) then clicking the Zoom Tool
    • Fact: Photoshop is a two handed program
    • Keyboard shortcuts can greatly speed up your work
    • Do not use the Zoom In/Zoom Out boxes in the Options Bar
  8. To zoom in to one of the Simpson's characters, click, hold and drag out a zoom box
  9. Pan around a zoomed in image with the Hand Tool
    • If you want access to the Hand Tool while using a different tool, hold down the SPACEBAR
  10. From the Menu Bar, go to View > Fit on Screen
  11. At the bottom of the Toolbar you can change your Screen Modes
    • Tap the letter ‘f’ to easily toggle through the Screen Modes
    • There are only 4 screen modes - you really CANNOT get lost
    • Hit the TAB to hide toolbars/panels/menus
  12. Set the foreground and background colors to the default (black over white) in the Toolbar
  13. Select the Brush Tool from the Tool Bar
  14. Paint 10 brush strokes over the Simpson's image
    • Fact: Photoshop is engineered for you to move both forward and backward in time (History)
  15. To undo and redo the last thing you did to your image:
    • In the Menu Bar, go to Edit > Undo
    • In the Menu Bar, go to Edit > Redo
    • Critical Keyboard Shortcut: CMD [PC/CTRL] - z
  16. To undo multiple steps:
    • In the Menu Bar, go to Edit > Step Backward
    • Critical Keyboard Shortcut: To step backward in time use CMD [PC/CTRL] + OPTION [PC/ALT] - z
  17. To redo multiple steps:
    • In the Menu Bar, go to Edit > Step Forward
    • Critical Keyboard Shortcut: To step forward in time use CMD [PC/CTRL] + SHIFT [PC/SHIFT] - z
  18. The number of steps back you can take is based on a Preference setting - which we set to 50
  19. From the Menu Bar go to File > Close - do not save
Exercise 3 - Using Adobe Bridge to manage your image collections...

Exercise 3 - Using Adobe Bridge to manage your image collections...

In this exercise we will use Adobe Bridge to view and manage our class images. We will also explore some handy features of this complimentary, file browsing program.

Step by Step »

  1. From the Photoshop Menu Bar, go to File > Browse (this will launch Adobe Bridge)
  2. In Bridge, load the default workspace (Window > Workspace > Reset to Default Workspace)
  3. Navigate to the 'ps-1-day' folder from under the Favorites tab (left)
  4. Explore some Bridge functionality:
    • Use the slider (along bottom) to increase & decrease the size of your thumbnails
    • Toggle though the 'quick' workspace buttons (lower right)
  5. In Adobe Bridge, double-click to open layers.psd in Photoshop
    • On a Mac, if you do not want Adobe Bridge sitting behind your Photoshop, from the Photoshop menu bar go to Photoshop > Hide Others
Exercise 4 - All About Layers...

Exercise 4 - All About Layers...

In this exercise we will explore one of the most powerful features of Photoshop...Layers. As you will spend much of your time in Photoshop working with layer related issues, it is important to walk through a handful of the most important aspects of layer usage.

  1. Tap the letter 'f' on your keyboard until you are in Full Screen Mode with Menu Bar
  2. From the Menu Bar, go to View > Fit on Screen
  3. In the Tool Bar, select the Move Tool
  4. Changing the size of your layer thumbnails:
    • Right-click in the dead space below all layers and choose your preferred size - Medium is good for this class
  5. Hiding the visibility of a layer:
    • Click on the 'eye' to the left of the layer thumbnail
  6. Renaming a layer:
    • Double-click PRECISELY on the text you want to re-name...and type away
  7. Highlighting (putting the focus on) a particular layer:
    • Simply click on the layer thumbnail
  8. Moving a layer:
    • Select the Move Tool from the Tool Bar
    • Highlight (select) the layer you want to move...
    • With the mouse...click, hold and drag on the pixels (in the image) that are associated with the highlighted layer
  9. Re stacking layers:
    • With the mouse...click and hold on the layer thumbnail...
    • Drag the layer up or down to where you want it in the layer stack - note the bolded line between layers
    • Nothing can go below the Background Layer
  10. Layer opacity (a.k.a. transparency):
    • Highlight the layer you want to change the opacity of...
    • Adjust the opacity slider in the upper right corner of the layer's palette
  11. Layer styles (Drop Shadow, Bevel, etc):
    • Highlight the layer you want to add a layer style to...
    • Click the 'fx' button at the bottom of the layer's palette
    • Apply and adjust the style of your choice
  12. Duplicating a layer:
    • Right-click on the layer name and choose Duplicate layer...
  13. Adding a new layer:
    • Simply click the New Layer icon to the left of the garbage at the bottom of the layer's palette
    • New layers are always added above the currently highlighted layer
  14. Deleting a layer:
    • Highlight the layer you want to delete and click on the garbage can
  15. There are only two other layer types:
    • Text layers (created automatically as you use the Text Tool)
    • Adjustment layers (layers added by you to adjust the look of you image)
  16. Tap the letter 'f' until you are in the Standard Screen Mode (the default)
  17. From the Menu Bar go to File > Close - do not save
Exercise 5 - Cropping and Adjusting

Exercise 5 - Cropping and Adjusting

In this exercise we'll start by cropping away unwanted pixels from around our image. We'll then add a series of adjustment layers to enhance both the image tonality (darkness/lightness) and overall color saturation. We'll end the exercise with demos of both automated and advanced cropping features included in Photoshop.

Step by Step »

  1. In Adobe Bridge, double-click to open england.jpg
  2. Tap the letter 'f' on your keyboard until you are in Full Screen Mode with Menu Bar
  3. From the Menu Bar, go to View > Fit on Screen
    • double-clicking the Hand Tool gets you to the above Fit on Screen...faster
  4. Rotating and cropping simultaneously with the Crop Tool:
    • With the mouse...click, hold and drag out a rough crop - don't worry it matching the image bounds yet
    • Move your cursor outside the crop box to activate the rotate crop box feature - note the curvy, arrow cursor
    • With the mouse...click, hold and drag to rotate the crop box (by eye) so it matches the image angle
    • Adjust the crop box control handles to match the image bounds
    • Hit RETURN [PC/ENTER] when done (or ESCAPE to start over)
  5. From the Menu Bar, go to View > Fit on Screen
  6. From the bottom of the layers palette, add an Adjustment Layer for Levels
  7. In the Levels dialogue box:
    • Bring in the white slider to the edge of the pixel mountain
    • Toggle the preview checkbox on and off to see the results of your adjustment
    • Hit OK to apply the Levels adjustment
  8. About the Adjustment layer:
    • You can re-enter the Levels Adjustment Layer by double-clicking the Adjustment thumbnail
    • From the Menu Bar, going to Image > Adjustments > Levels does not add a Levels Adjustment Layer - so be careful
    • FYI: The white box to the right of the Adjustment thumbnail is a Mask - it's use is outside the scope of this class
  9. From the bottom of the layers palette, add a second Adjustment Layer for Brightness/Contrast:
  10. In the Brightness/Contrast dialogue box:
    • Adjust the brightness and contrast values...to your own taste
    • Toggle the preview checkbox on and off to see the results of your adjustment
    • Pro Tip: DO NOT 'Use Legacy' (it activates an old, yucky algorithm)
    • Hit OK to apply the Brightness/Contrast adjustment
  11. From the bottom of the layers palette, add a third Adjustment Layer for Hue/Saturation
  12. In the Hue/Saturation dialogue box:
    • Adjust the saturation value...to your own taste
    • Toggle the preview checkbox on and off to see the results of your adjustment
    • Hit OK to apply the Hue/Saturation adjustment
  13. Open the History Palette
  14. Walk through your History states
  15. Tap the letter 'f' until you are in the Standard Screen Mode (the default)
  16. From the Menu Bar, go to File > Save as...england-2.psd
    • Saving as a .psd file preserves your layers - allowing for future editing
  17. From the Menu Bar, go to File > Close
  18. Demo: Photoshop's Automate Tools (File > Automate)
  19. Demo: Perspective crop
Exercise 6 - Straightening and Adjusting - Output for Email

Exercise 6 - Straightening and Adjusting - Output for Email

In this exercise we'll start by correcting an uneven horizon, then re-cropping the straightened result. We'll then add a series of adjustment layers to enhance the image tonality and adjust a specific color range (namely, the ocean and sky blues). We'll end the exercise by walking through some simple steps to convert our full size image into one more suitable for emailing.

Step by Step »

  1. In Adobe Bridge, double-click to open kahala.jpg
  2. Tap the letter 'f' on your keyboard until you are in Full Screen Mode with Menu Bar
  3. From the Menu Bar, go to View > Fit on Screen
  4. In the Tool bar, select the Zoom Tool
  5. With the mouse...click, hold and drag a zoom box over a long portion of the horizon
  6. In the Tool Bar, select the Ruler Tool (under the Eyedropper Tool, near the bottom of the Tool Bar)
  7. With the mouse...click, hold and drag the Ruler Tool from one point on the horizon to another further down the horizon
    • Note: Photoshop has taken a mental note of the angle you measured with the Ruler Tool
    • Note: If you care...the angle measured by the ruler tool appears in the Options Bar
  8. From the Menu Bar, go to Image > Rotate Canvas > Arbitrary
    • Notice that Photoshop carries the measured angle through to the dialogue box - hit OK
  9. The straightened image now needs to be cropped...do this with the Crop Tool
    • The icon for the Crop Tool is pretty clunky (it's hard to tell where it draws from)
    • To change a tool icon to a precise cursor, tap the Caps Lock key on your keyboard
    • Demo: If (while dragging a crop box) Photoshop attempts to help you by snapping, you can override snapping by holding down the CONTROL key (on both Mac and PC) as you drag
    • Hit RETURN [PC/ENTER] when done (or ESCAPE to start over)
  10. From the bottom of the layers palette, add an Adjustment Layer for Levels
  11. In the Levels dialogue box:
    • Bring in both the black and white sliders to the edges of the pixel mountain
    • Pro Tip: Add the OPTION [PC/ALT] key while adjusting sliders to preview the areas that will loose detail
    • Adjust the middle, Gray slider to set the overall image brightness...to your own taste
    • Toggle the preview checkbox on and off to see the results of your adjustment
    • Hit OK to apply the Levels adjustment
  12. From the bottom of the layers palette, add a second Adjustment Layer for Hue/Saturation
  13. In the Hue/Saturation dialogue box, increase only the saturation of the ocean and sky blues by:
    • Choose any color from the drop down menu (under Master)
    • Move to the image and sample a blue from the sky with the eyedropper
    • Note the range of color that will be effected (the gray bar between the rainbows at bottom)
    • Adjust the saturation slider...to your own taste
  14. Reset the Hue/Saturation dialogue box by:
    • Holding down the OPTION [PC/ALT] key - the Cancel button should say Reset - click it
  15. Practice: Re-adjust the saturation of the sky on your own
  16. From the Menu Bar, go to File > Save as...kahala-2.psd
  17. Two good qualities of an email image are:
    • An image that fits on a recipient's screen without horizontal scrolling
    • An image that is small in file size (kb) so it transfers quickly over the internet...and doesn't clog up the recipient's e-mailbox
  18. From the Menu Bar, go to Image > Image Size
  19. In the Image Size dialogue box:
    • Note that your image width (in pixels) is far too big to fit on most monitors (and within the email application)
    • Be sure the Constrain Proportions check box is checked
    • Be sure the Resample Image check box is checked
    • Be sure Bicubic Sharper (Best for Reduction) is selected
    • Change the width value to 600 pixels - note that this is a major decrease in the existing pixel count
    • Hit OK to exit (and resize)
  20. From the Menu Bar, go to File > Save as...kahala-email.psd - this is the low-resolution, email version
  21. From the Menu Bar, go to View > Actual Pixels
    • Notice that the image has lost sharpness due to the significant reduction in pixels
    • Actual Pixels means you are looking at you image @ 100% - ideal for sharpening
    • double-clicking the Zoom Tool gets you the above Actual Pixels...faster
  22. From the Menu Bar, go to Filter > Sharpen > Unsharp Mask
  23. In the Unsharp Mask dialogue box, try these settings:
    • Amount: 400 (this number can be reduced if the sharpening is too strong)
    • Radius: 0.2
    • Threshold: 0
    • Remember, it is better to under sharpen than is is to over sharpen
  24. From the Menu Bar, go to File > Save for Web & Devices...to begin saving a .jpg, suitable for email
  25. In the Save for Web & Devices dialogue box:
    • Be sure the Optimized tab is selected (along the top)
    • At the right, under Preset: choose JPEG High
    • Save your email ready file
  26. Tap the letter 'f' until you are in the Standard Screen Mode (the default)
  27. Save your file
  28. Close your file
  29. Demo: File sizes in Bridge
  30. Practice what you've learned:
    • In Adobe Bridge, in the practice folder, double-click to open my-dogs.jpg
    • Check and adjust the levels if needed (use an Adjustment layer)
    • Adjust the image contrast (use an Brightness/Contrast Adjustment layer) to your own taste
    • Save the file as a .psd (Photoshop document)
    • Resize the image for emailing
    • Re-sharpen the image
    • Re-save the file as a second .psd (name it so you know it's the low-resolution, email version)
    • Save the image for email
    • Close the .psd file
  31. Demo: The Lens Correction filter and adjustments
Exercise 7 - Retouching and Text

Exercise 7 - Retouching and Text

In this exercise we'll start by utilizing a pair of retouching tools to clean up dust specs and larger smudges. We'll then utilized a third tool to remove actual content (boats, rocks, etc.) from the image. We'll then add extra space under the image, color that space, and add a text caption. We'll end the exercise by adding an adjustable, sepia photo filter.

Step by Step »

  1. In Adobe Bridge, double-click to open vietnam.jpg
  2. Tap the letter 'f' on your keyboard until you are in Full Screen Mode with Menu Bar
  3. From the Menu Bar, go to View > Fit on Screen
  4. Duplicate the Background layer:
    • Right-click on the Background layer name and choose Duplicate Layer...from the menu
    • In the dialogue box...name the layer 'retouching'
    • Retouching on a copy (duplicate) layer protects the original image
  5. Remove dust and smudges with the Spot Healing Brush Tool
    • Many tools in Photoshop are based around the idea of a brush - the Spot Healing Brush Tool is one of them
    • Critical Keyboard Shortcut: The Bracket keys - [ & ] - change your brush size on the fly
    • Pro Tip: With a brush tool active, right-click to get to its size and hardness adjustments
    • When working with the Spot Healing Brush Tool, set the brush size to slightly bigger than the spot you want to remove
  6. Fix the upper left corner of sky with the Healing Brush Tool
    • The Healing Brush Tool requires that you first set a sample point (of the good stuff) before painting over the bad stuff
  7. Remove the rocks, boat and date(s) with the Patch Tool
    • With the Patch Tool, you circle (select) the bad stuff, then drag the selection over the good stuff
  8. From the bottom of the layers palette, add an Adjustment Layer for Levels
  9. In the Levels dialogue box:
    • Bring in both the black and white sliders to the edges of the pixel mountain
    • Toggle the preview checkbox on and off to see the results of your adjustment
    • Hit OK to apply the Levels adjustment
  10. From the bottom of the layers palette, add a second Adjustment Layer for Photo Filter
  11. In the Photo Filter dialogue box:
    • Flip through a few of the available filters
    • Choose and experiment (Density) with a Sepia filter
    • Hit OK to apply the Sepia Photo Filter adjustment
  12. Covert the Background layer to a regular layer:
    • Nothing can go below that Background layer - this is often limiting to you as a user
    • Background layers cannot have transparency (i.e. you can't look through them)
    • Renaming the Background layer converts it into a regular layer
    • Pro Tip: Convert by OPTION [PC/ALT] double-clicking the Background layer thumbnail
  13. To add additional space under the image with the Crop Tool:
    • Drag a Crop Box around the entire image
    • Pull the bottom, middle control handle down to add extra space
    • Hit RETURN [PC/ENTER] when done (or ESCAPE to start over)
  14. From the bottom of the layers palette, add an Adjustment Layer for Solid Color - pick any color
    • This Adjustment Layer will cover your image for now- choose any color to start
    • Hit OK to apply the Solid Color adjustment
  15. Drag the Solid Color Adjustment Layer to the bottom of the layer stack
  16. Re-adjust the Solid Color Adjustment Layer, picking a color from the image
  17. Add a caption to the extra space with the Text Tool - style and position to your own taste
    • Note that when you add text, Photoshop creates a special text layer
    • When you finish typing your caption tap CMD-RETURN [PC/CTRL-ENTER] - or toggle tools
    • Changing the text (font, size, color, etc) happens in the Options Bar
    • You must have both the Text Tool and your text layer selected to edit the text
  18. With your text layer selected:
    • From the bottom of the layers palette, click the fx icon
    • Add a Drop Shadow Layer Style
    • Adjust the Drop Shadow to your own taste
  19. Toggle through your screen modes (f) until you get to a black background - a great place to admire/critique your work
  20. Tap Tab to hide the workspace
  21. Tap CMD [PC/CTRL] 0 to maximize your image
  22. From the Menu Bar go to File > Save as...vietnam-2.psd
  23. Tap the letter 'f' until you are in the Standard Screen Mode (the default)
  24. From the Menu Bar go to File > Close
  25. Demo: The Clone Tool
Exercise 8 - Canvas Size, Transformations and Adjustments

Exercise 8 - Canvas Size, Transformations and Adjustments

In this exercise we'll mirror an image by first adjusting the canvas size, then duplicating, transforming, and moving a layer into position side by side. We'll then add a series of adjustment layers to enhance the image tonality and remove a slight color cast. We'll end the exercise by converting the mirrored image to a Black & White.

Step by Step »

  1. In Adobe Bridge, double-click to open palolo.jpg
  2. Tap the letter 'f' on your keyboard until you are in Full Screen Mode with Menu Bar
  3. From the Menu Bar, go to View > Fit on Screen
  4. Covert the Background layer to a regular layer by renaming it or OPTION [PC/ALT] double-clicking the Background layer thumbnail
  5. From the Menu Bar, go to Image > Canvas Size
  6. In the Canvas Size dialogue box:
    • In the 3x3 grid of squares, click left middle box so the new canvas expands off to the right
    • Enter 200 for the width and set the measurement to percent
    • Hit OK to add the new canvas
  7. From the Menu Bar go to View > Fit on Screen
  8. Duplicate the image layer:
    • Right-click the layer name and choose Duplicate Layer...from the menu
  9. With the duplicate layer selected, from the Menu Bar, go to Edit > Transform > Flip Horizontal
  10. With the Move Tool, move the flipped layer to the right - to mirror the image
    • Note: While moving, add SHIFT to constrain the movement
  11. From the bottom of the layers palette, add an Adjustment Layer for Levels
  12. In the Levels dialogue box:
    • Bring in the black slider slightly to the edge of the pixel mountain
    • Toggle the preview checkbox on and off to see the results of your adjustment
    • Hit OK to apply the Levels adjustment
  13. From the bottom of the layers palette, add a second Adjustment Layer for Color Balance
  14. In the Color Balance dialogue box:
    • Move the Yellow/Blue slider slightly towards the blue to remove the yellow color cast
    • Toggle the preview checkbox on and off to see the results of your adjustment
    • Hit OK to apply the Color Balance adjustment
  15. Before the next step, take a mental note of where the rusty reds are in the image
  16. From the bottom of the layers palette, add a third Adjustment Layer for Black & White
  17. In the Black & White dialogue box:
    • Click on a pixel area that you noted as being rusty red - note that Photoshop shows you what slider you should adjust
    • Adjust the red slider to your own taste
    • Try adjusting the other color sliders to your own taste
    • Toggle the preview checkbox on and off to see the results of your adjustment
    • Hit OK to apply the Black & White adjustment
  18. From the bottom of the layers palette, add a fourth Adjustment Layer for Brightness/Contrast:
  19. In the Brightness/Contrast dialogue box:
    • Adjust the brightness and contrast values...to your own taste
    • Toggle the preview checkbox on and off to see the results of your adjustment
    • Hit OK to apply the Brightness/Contrast adjustment
  20. Tap the letter 'f' until you are in the Standard Screen Mode (the default)
  21. From the Menu Bar go to File > Save as...palolo-2.psd
  22. From the Menu Bar go to File > Close
  23. Practice what you've learned:
    • In Adobe Bridge, in the practice folder, double-click to open pool.jpg
    • Mirror the image in exactly the same manner as you did above
    • After mirroring, check and adjust the levels if needed (use an Adjustment layer)
    • Adjust image contrast (use an Brightness/Contrast Adjustment layer) - to your own own taste
    • Change the color (Hue) of the water with a Hue/Saturation layer
    • Save the file as a .psd (Photoshop document)
  24. Demo: Slideshow in Adobe Bridge
Exercise 9 - Select and Separate - Output for webpage

Exercise 9 - Select and Separate - Output for webpage

In this exercise we'll use one of a handful of Photoshop selection tools to select and separate a portion of an image. After separating, we'll enhance the look on the pixels we targeted and add a flexible background color. We'll end the exercise by resizing the image so its fits on a webpage.

Step by Step »

  1. In Adobe Bridge, double-click to open coca-cola.jpg
  2. Tap the letter 'f' on your keyboard until you are in Full Screen Mode with Menu Bar
  3. From the Menu Bar go to View > Fit on Screen
  4. With the mouse...click, hold and drag a zoom box around the Coca-Cola sticker in the window
  5. From the Tool Bar, select the Elliptical Marquee Tool (under the Rectangular Marquee Tool, near the top)
  6. Drag out a 'rough' selection for the sticker
    • Demo 1: Deselecting a selection (from the Menu Bar, go to Select > Deselect)
    • Demo 2: Dragging a perfect circle selection (add SHIFT while dragging)
    • Demo 3: Dragging selection out from the center (add OPTION [PC/ALT] while dragging)
  7. From the Menu Bar, go to Select > Transform Selection
  8. Use the transform handles to adjust your selection of the Coca-Cola sticker
    • Demo: The Refine Edge button in the Tool Options Bar
  9. From the Menu Bar, go to Layer > New > Layer via Copy
  10. Toggle the Background layer visibility on and off
  11. Highlight the Background layer and click the Garbage Can at the bottom of the layers palette
  12. From the Menu Bar go to Image > Trim
  13. In the Trim dialogue box:
    • Choose Based On - Transparent Pixels
    • Make sure it is set to trim all 4 sides
  14. From the bottom of the layers palette, add an Adjustment Layer for Solid Color - pick any color
    • This Adjustment Layer will cover your image for now- choose any color to start
    • Hit OK to apply the Solid Color adjustment
  15. Drag the Solid Color Adjustment Layer to the bottom of the layer stack
  16. Re-adjust the Solid Color Adjustment Layer, picking a color from the image
  17. From the Menu Bar, go to File > Save as...coca-cola.psd
  18. On the class webpage, go to the example image at the start of this exercise
    • Right-click on the image and request its Properties
    • Take note of the pixel count for width
  19. From the Menu Bar, go to Image > Image Size
  20. In the Image Size dialogue box:
    • Note that your image width (in pixels) is far too big
    • Be sure the Constrain Proportions check box is on
    • Be sure the Resample Image check box is on
    • Be sure Bicubic Sharper (Best for Reduction) is selected
    • For the width value of the image, enter the width value gathered from the webpage above
    • Hit ok to exit
  21. From the Menu Bar, go to Filter > Sharpen > Unsharp Mask
  22. In the Unsharp Mask dialogue box, try these settings:
    • Amount: 400 (this number can be reduced if the sharpening is too strong)
    • Radius: 0.2
    • Threshold: 0
    • Remember, it is better to under sharpen than is is to over sharpen
  23. From the Menu Bar, go to File > Save as...coca-cola-web.psd - this is the low-resolution, web version
  24. From the Menu Bar, go to File > Save for Web & Devices...
  25. In the Save for Web & Devices try these settings:
    • Be sure the Optimized tab is selected (top)
    • At the right, under Preset: choose either JPEG High or JPG Medium - you decide based on quality vs. file size
    • Save your web page ready file
  26. Demo: JPG, GIF and PNG
  27. From the Menu Bar, go to File > Close
Exercise 10 - Select and Adjust

Exercise 10 - Select and Adjust

In this exercise we'll use one of a handful of Photoshop selection tools to target a portion of the image. We'll then add an adjustment layer to change the color (hue) and saturation of the pixels we selected.

  1. In Adobe Bridge, double-click to open weekly.jpg
  2. Tap the letter 'f' on your keyboard until you are in Full Screen Mode with Menu Bar
  3. From the Menu Bar, go to View > Fit on Screen
  4. From the Tool Bar, select the Polygonal Lasso Tool
    • The icon for the Polygonal Lasso Tool is pretty clunky (it's hard to tell where it draws from)
    • To change the icon to a precise cursor, tap the Caps Lock key on you keyboard
  5. Carefully click out a selection around the box:
    • If you make a mistake - use the DELETE (PC/BACKSPACE) to undo points you've put down
    • When you get back to where you started, hover over the first point until you see a little circle - then click to close
  6. From the bottom of the layers palette, add an Adjustment Layer for Hue/Saturation
  7. In the Hue/Saturation dialogue box:
    • Adjust both the hue and saturation values...to your own taste
    • Toggle the preview checkbox on and off to see the results of your adjustment
    • Hit OK to apply the Hue/Saturation adjustment
  8. Notice the layer mask adjacent to your Hue/Saturation Adjustment Layer:
    • White in the mask is ALLOWING the adjustment to pass through
    • Black in the mask is BLOCKING the adjustment from passing through
  9. Bonus: If time allows - Adjusting the layer mask with a brush
  10. From the bottom of the layers palette, add a Adjustment Layer for Levels
    • Adjust as necessary
  11. From the bottom of the layers palette, add a Adjustment Layer for Brightness/Contrast
    • Adjust to taste
  12. From the Menu Bar go to File > Save as...weekly-2.psd
  13. From the Menu Bar go to File > Close

 

Exercise 11 - Outputting an image for Print

Exercise 11 - Outputting an image for Print

In this exercise we will walk through the basic steps needed to modify an digital photo for printing, to specific print specs, at a local camera shop.

Step by Step »

  1. I went to Kaimuki Camera and asked 4 vital questions regarding how to prepare my images for printing at their shop:
    • What Physical Size should I prepare my images to? From a variety of choices offered, I choose to go with 4"x6" prints
    • What Resolution should I set my images? I was told to set my images to 300 ppi
    • What Color Mode (RGB or CMYK) should my images be in? I was told RGB was the preferred mode
    • What File Format would you like me to provide the images in? I was told JPG (Highest Quality)
  2. Armed with the 4 print specs above, I was now ready to prepare images in Photoshop
  3. In Adobe Bridge, open kaimuki-camera folder
  4. Double-click to open 01.jpg
  5. Immediately notice that the image is in RGB
    • 1 print spec down, 3 to go
  6. Tap the letter 'f' on your keyboard until you are in Full Screen Mode with Menu Bar
  7. From the Menu Bar, go to View > Fit on Screen
  8. From the Menu Bar, go to Image > Image Size
  9. In the Image Size dialogue box:
    • Turn of the Resample button off
    • Enter 300 into the Resolution box
    • Check the Document Size width and height values and ask yourself "Do I have enough pixels to make a 4x6" print @ 300?"
    • Hit CANCEL to Exit
  10. From the Tool Bar, select the Crop Tool
  11. In the Options Bar, set:
    • the Width to 6 in and the Height to 4 in
    • Set the Resolution to 300
  12. Drag out a crop box over you image:
    • Notice that the Crop Tool is only allowing you to draw at a 6:4 ratio
    • Notice that my camera does not capture at a standard print size
    • Hit RETURN [PC/ENTER] when done (or ESCAPE to start over)
  13. Once cropped, to double-check, go to Image > Image Size
    • 2 more print specs down - 1 to go
  14. At this point you may want do any number of things to improve your image
    • At the very minimum...check your Levels
  15. From the Menu Bar, go to File > Save as...01-kc.psd
  16. From the Menu Bar, go to File > Save as...01-kc.jpg
  17. When a dialogue box asks you what quality you want to save your JPG, choose the highest
    • 4 print specs down, all done !!
  18. From the Menu Bar, go to File > Close
  19. Practice what you've learned:
    • In Adobe Bridge, in the kaimuki-camera folder, double-click to open another image
    • Resize the image and set the resolution to the above specs
    • Adjust the image to your own taste
    • Save the file as a .psd (Photoshop document)
    • Save the file as a .jpg (highest quality)

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